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Product FAQ

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Why Bamboo and Sugarcane?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

How does Caboo paper compare in softness to other tissues?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

How is Caboo more eco-friendly than recycled paper?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

Do you use chlorine bleach to whiten the paper?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

Is Caboo Toilet Paper biodegradable?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

Where is the bamboo and sugarcane sourced?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

Does harvesting bamboo impact panda habitat?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

How do you ship your goods and what kind of a carbon footprint does it leave behind?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

How is your process for turning bamboo & sugarcane into paper sustainable?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

Why not hemp or other renewable resources that are grown locally?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

What certifications does your production facility have?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

Why do you use plastic packaging for some products?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

Will you be offering any new products in the future?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.

Where can I buy Caboo?

Bamboo and Sugarcane are grasses, not hardwoods. They both grow very quickly and, after harvest, grow back just as quickly. No replanting is necessary. Unlike trees, which can take up to 30 years to grow and mature, bamboo and sugarcane grow back as quickly as in three to four months. When a tree is cut, it never grows back. In addition, bamboo’s natural rhizome (root) network protects soil from erosion and retains moisture, and bamboo can grow in environments with depleted soil and little water. In fact, it actually returns nutrients to the soil; improving degraded areas. Bamboo doesn’t require fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides. Sugarcane is much like bamboo, but with an added environmental bonus. The “bagasse” – the dry fibrous residue that remains after the extraction of juice from the crushed stalks – is what we use to make our paper. Normally this bagasse is either disposed or burned, meaning we are re-purposing what would otherwise be discarded.